Putting your Pants on One Leg at a Time

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Version française ci-bas.

University of Ottawa OUTLAW Executive & University of Ottawa Law Union Steering Committee
Endorsed by:
Galldin Robertson Law; Muslim Law Students’ Association; National Black Law Students’ Association of Canada; University of Ottawa Association of Women and the Law; University of Ottawa Black Law Students’ Association


“How to dress well: Lessons in professionalism and putting your pants on one leg at a time”
As members of Fauteux’s LGBTQA community, the OUTLAW Executive and the Law Union Steering Committee publically respond to a trend of encouraging students to dress in particular ways at school. These ideas are often espoused under the guise of professionalism. We take issue with directives presented at events organized and facilitated by Faculty of Law staff as part of OCI preparation sessions, and echoed in, “You Have the Right to Remain Stylish”, published by Inter Pares on October 31, 2012. We realize the article has been removed, and censorship is not our intention. This response is not directed at any person or article in particular. We respect students’ rights to share ideas on any topic, including fashion. We refer instead to pervasive ideologies of gender and class in our school and future profession. We take issue with putting these forward as professional imperatives essential for success. Further, we wish to acknowledge the recent incident of overt racism in Fauteux. We stand in solidarity with/as law students of colour against racism; these are not separable or isolated incidents. These acts and messages are all about policing who can be a legitimate member of the legal community. We see this response as in line with the Black Law Students Association’s and their allies’ calls to challenge all forms of discrimination.
Elitist, ableist, sexist, racist and gender-essentialist values about presenting oneself in particular ways are not simply facts of law school life. Suggestions that the law is a conservative profession and that this kind of message is inevitable are antithetical to this school’s commitment to social justice. People should not be told how to dress unsolicitedly and not every person who identifies as a woman wears jewelery or a skirt. There is a clear directive behind these “tips”, which is the proposition that if law students do not conform to specific gender and class standards, they will not succeed. This kind of conversation perpetuates the idea that someone's academic and professional qualifications matter less than their ability to dress the part. The fact is that some people cannot or will not dress the part.
The focus on appearance over competence is harmful to women, trans and gender non-conforming people, and students who are economically disadvantaged. Pointing out attempts and failures at passing when it comes to gender and/or class creates real barriers. Recommended clothing choices, such as knee length skirt suits with moderate heels, represent a Western standard of attire. This standard is centered around a white ideal that actively ignores the diversity of cultural and religious backgrounds in our student body. High end stores carry a limited range of sizes that most people will not fit into comfortably, and many cannot afford the prices. Many cannot come to law school precisely because they are not wealthy. Suggesting that it is necessary or ideal to buy expensive clothing excludes students who do not have the financial means, who may live on a fixed income, or who shop strategically. 
Ableist assumptions are also prevalent in these types of conversations. When a person with a visible disability chooses to dress down they are flagged as sloppy and unable to dress well, while for those who pass as "able" or who are not disabled, the assumption is that they have chosen to dress down. People with physical disabilities are discriminated against because mobility aids like canes and orthotics are viewed as unstylish and meant to be hidden. Some individuals are told to suffer without their aids or to conform in order to look the part of a "proper” lawyer. This is a policing of all bodies in all ways. Fatphobia, transphobia, ableism, racism, homophobia, sexism, and classism  are inseparable here.
Professionalism itself is a problematic idea, in part because we hesitate to interrogate it for fear of failing the standard. Suggestions have been made that the way law students (especially feminine presenting women) look could directly affect their job prospects and the references they get from professors. The notion that the way students present has any bearing on the willingness of a professor to write a strong reference letter is disrespectful to our professors and suggests a lack of academic integrity. These implications take this conversation out of the realm of mere opinion. 
The notion that these are “friendly” tips is often presented as a defense to this kind of policing of gender and class. In conversation about the appropriate response to these tips, a colleague said this:
“[I mean] 1) To refuse the pleasantries of a discourse that wields 'well-meant advice' and 'being nice' as one of the most common tools used to police gender in grossly conservative ways.
2) Keeping things in the realm of the objective and logical loses, for me, the real core of what is going on in a situation like this - means that those being policed and quietly urged to look normal are required to feel nothing in order to respond - to not be angry or hurt, to deny what happens to those experiencing inequality. Objectivity and angry feelings of injustice aren't mutually exclusive and don't undo one another. I feel quite capable of taking apart a bad syllogism using logic, but I also FEEL the policing of feminine propriety as a personal wrong that is done every day to me […] and the people I love and admire. "Acting badly" or "being angry and taking it personally" is an option that is denied by just the sort of pleasant femininity forwarded [in this dialogue]. And it's an option I want. I don't use it often, but I think that we - all of us thinking about these kinds of things - need to spend some time considering why we feel so uncomfortable when girls stop being nice” (quoted with permission).

The false notion that women are only as good as they look, and that there is only one way to look good, is antiquated and should be rejected. Surely there are more productive conversations to have about how to cultivate a professional reputation. Perhaps professionalism could be redefined as a commitment to not exposing your colleagues to damaging narratives of necessary conformity.
It is misleading to frame the article in terms of individual opinion. We make no assumptions about the motivations of the author or the editorial staff of Inter Pares. In fact, we are sure that the article was meant to be light hearted. However, it is indicative of the messages that women and gender non-conforming law students get regularly from (big) law firms and school representatives on how to present themselves in interviews and at jobs. Defining this as a "singular opinion" hides the repeated and compounding nature of these conversations and the harmful impact that they have.
OUTLAW and the Law Union would like to call on their members and colleagues to shift the focus away from appearance, and toward ideas.
Signed,
University of Ottawa OUTLAW Executive & University of Ottawa Law Union Steering Committee
Endorsed by:
Galldin Robertson Law; Muslim Law Students’ Association; National Black Law Students’ Association of Canada; University of Ottawa Association of Women and the Law; University of Ottawa Black Law Students’ Association



Leçons de style, leçons en professionnalisme?

Signé,

Les membres de l’exécutif d’OUTLAW  & les membres du Comité de pilotage de l’Union du Droit (Law Union) de Université d’Ottawa

Appuyé par :

Galldin Robertson Law ; L'association des étudiants musulmans en droit ;L'association des étudiants noirs en droit de l'Université d'Ottawa ; L’Association femmes et droit de l’université d’Ottawa ; L'association nationale des étudiants noirs en droit du Canada .


En tant que membres de la communauté LGBTQA, de l’exécutif de l’Association des étudiants LGBTQ en droit (OUTLAW) et du Comité de pilotage de l’Union de droit (Law Union) de l’université d’Ottawa, nous répondons publiquement à une tendance dominante constatée à la Faculté de droit, qui encourage les étudiants à se conformer à certains normes vestimentaires.  Ce courant qui exerce  une pression à se conformer, se présente souvent sous le couvert du professionnalisme.  Nous contestons l’importance injustifiée accordée à la « façon appropriée » de se vêtir, tel que manifesté dans le cadre de certains évènements organisés par la Faculté de droit.  Les séances de préparation en vue des entrevues sur le campus (en anglais, les « OCI ») sont un exemple qui illustre  l’imposition de ces normes.  Cette tendance s’est manifestement révélée, entre autres, dans l’article paru dans le numéro du 31 octobre 2012 d’Inter Pares « You have the right to remain stylish ».  Nous constatons, d’ailleurs, que cet article fut supprimé de la page web où il fut initialement publié, et nous affirmons que la censure n’est pas notre objectif.  La présente ne cherche aucunement à cibler une personne ou un texte particulier. Nous considérons comme étant primordial le respect du droit à chacun d’exprimer et de partager ses opinions. Plutôt, nous contestons certaines idéologies largement répandues imposant des normes suggérant des présuppositions stéréotypées  quant au genre, aux sexes et aux classes, comme étant des impératifs professionnels essentiels à la réussite. De plus, nous tenons à dénoncer l’incident de racisme survenu récemment dans l’édifice Fauteux. Nous exprimons solidairement notre rejet face au racisme avec --et en tant qu’-- étudiants de couleur de la faculté. Nous sommes conscients qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un incident isolé, mais plutôt d’un acte qui s’inscrit dans un schéma de racisme systémique. La présente est conforme avec les appels de l’Association des Étudiant(e)s noir(e)s en droit, ainsi que ses alliés contestant toutes les formes de discrimination.

Les valeurs élitistes, capacitistes, sexistes, racistes et essentialistes véhiculées par les discours sur « comment bien se présenter » ne sont pas anodines. L’opinion que le domaine du droit est une profession historiquement « conservatrice », et donc que ce genre de discours est inévitable, semble antithétique vis-à-vis du mandat de la Faculté de droit d’oeuvrer vers une plus grande justice sociale. Les étudiants et autres personnes ne devraient pas se faire constamment dicter de manière non sollicitée les normes concernant la façon appropriée de se vêtir et de se présenter. Par exemple, ce ne sont pas toutes les personnes qui s’identifient en tant que femme qui portent des jupes et des bijoux. Les normes vestimentaires disséminées par le milieu académique du Droit et la profession juridique semblent suggérer que si les étudiant(e)s en droit ne se conforment pas à ces normes, qui sont intimement liées à des préconceptions liées au genre et à la classe, ils ne réussiront peut-être pas. Ce genre de proposition perpétue l'idée que les qualifications académiques et professionnelles d’une personne sont moins importantes que sa capacité à s’habiller conformément à une norme qui leur est imposée parfois directement ou indirectement.

L’insistance sur les questions d’apparences, plutôt que sur les questions de compétences est nuisible notamment envers les femmes, les personnes de sexe non-conforme et transgenre, et les étudiants qui sont économiquement défavorisés. Ces normes, et la différenciation qu’elles créent au sein de la population étudiante, produisent de réels obstacles pour plusieurs personnes. Par exemple, les vêtements conseillés « pour le succès » (tels les habits avec jupes à la hauteur des genoux et les talons hauts moyens) traduisent généralement des normes vestimentaires occidentales, et occultent souvent la diversité culturelle de ces normes à l’échelle internationale. En d’autres mots, les normes vestimentaires imposées découlent d’un idéal « blanc », qui ignore activement la diversité et les pratiques culturelles et religieuses des étudiants. L’on oublie que plusieurs personnes ne peuvent tout simplement pasavoir accès aux études en droit, puisqu’ils n’ont pas les moyens, ou parce qu’ils perçoivent des barrières par rapport à ce cheminement professionnel qui peut paraitre parfois assez exclusif.  Avancer l’idée qu’il est nécessaire, ou idéal, d’acheter des vêtements couteux marginalise les étudiants qui n’ont pas les moyens financiers, ni peut-être le gout, de s’habiller « convenablement » ou « avec style ».

De plus, plusieurs présomptions capacitistes prévalent dans ce genre de discours autour de la manière appropriée de se vêtir. Lorsqu’une personne ayant un handicap visible décide de s’habiller de façon décontractée, il y a une tendance à penser que cette personne ne sait pas s’habiller convenablement, tandis qu’un style décontracté chez une personne qui semble être non-handicapée laisse croire qu’il s’agit plutôt d’un simple choix.  Les personnes avec des handicaps physiques sont discriminées puisque les aidants à la mobilité, telles les canes pour marcher, ou bien les prothèses, sont perçus comme n’étant pas très « stylés » ou élégants. Certains individus souffrent sans leurs cannes ou leurs prothèses, mais ressentent la nécessité ou la pression de devoir se débrouiller sans eux, afin de se conformer à l’image projetée d’un(e) avocat(e) soigné(e) et professionnel(le).   Il s’agit de la manifestation d’une règlementation accrue des corps. Dans cette vue, les phénomènes de « fatphobia », de transphobie, de capacitisme, de racisme, d’homophobie, de sexisme, et de discrimination fondée sur la classe sont tous des phénomènes intimement reliés. 

De plus, la notion de « professionnalisme » en soi est problématique, puisqu’elle semble hors-de-portée de tout réel dialogue;  plusieurs n’osent pas interroger publiquement ce que signifie véritablement le professionnalisme, ainsi que l’importance accordée aux apparences, par peur d’être marginalisés par leur non-conformité.  Il est parfois avancé que l’image physique projetée par les étudiant(e)s (et particulièrement les étudiantes plus « féminines ») pourrait directement influencer leurs chances d’obtenir de bonnes références des professeurs, par exemple. Cette idée même est un affront et un manque de respect et de considération envers les membres du corps professoral, puisqu’elle suggère un manque d’intégrité académique.

L’imposition des normes concernant les apparences physiques et vestimentaires est souvent présentée sous le couvert de simples « conseils d’ami ».  Dans le cadre d’une discussion avec une collègue, cette dernière exprima ceci, concernant l’inhabilité générale de remettre en question ce genre de règlementation institutionnelle des corps :

“[I mean] 1) To refuse the pleasantries of a discourse that wields 'well-meant advice' and 'being nice' as one of the most common tools used to police gender in grossly conservative ways. 2) Keeping things in the realm of the objective and logical loses, for me, the real core of what is going on in a situation like this - means that those being policed and quietly urged to look normal are required to feel nothing in order to respond - to not be angry or hurt, to deny what happens to those experiencing inequality. Objectivity and angry feelings of injustice aren't mutually exclusive and don't undo one another. I feel quite capable of taking apart a bad syllogism using logic, but I also FEEL the policing of feminine propriety as a personal wrong that is done every day to me […] and the people I love and admire. "Acting badly" or "being angry and taking it personally" is an option that is denied by just the sort of pleasant femininity forwarded [in this dialogue]. And it's an option I want. I don't use it often, but I think that we - all of us thinking about these kinds of things - need to spend some time considering why we feel so uncomfortable when girls stop being nice” (quoted with permission).

La notion que les habiletés professionnelles d’une femme ou de toute personne se mesurent par son apparence et sa façon de se présenter, et ce, selon un standard normatif de ce qui est la « bonne » façon se s’habiller, doit être rejetée. Assurément, l’on pourrait cultiver des discussions beaucoup plus pertinentes et productives concernant les façons de développer une réputation professionnelle dans le milieu juridique. Par exemple, le professionnalisme pourrait être redéfini comme étant un engagement d’une personne envers ses collègues de ne pas les exposer à des récits de conformité obligatoire.

Dans cette vue, il est déroutant de simplement qualifier un article tel que celui publié dans la revue Inter Pares comme étant une opinion individuelle et isolée, bien que nous sommes certains que l’article n’avait pour but que d’être un commentaire léger.  Nous n’avançons pas de présuppositions quant aux motifs des auteurs et rédacteurs.  Cependant, il importe de noter qu’un tel article est symptomatique d’une tendance plus vaste et systémique créant un malaise parmi plusieurs étudiants et personnes dans la profession juridique, dont les femmes et les personnes non conformes au genre, ou transidentitaires/transsexuelles. Étiqueter ce genre d’article comme étant simplement une opinion singulière masque, en fait, la nature essentialiste de ce genre de discours normatif, et les impacts négatifs qu’ils peuvent exercer.

L’Association des étudiants LGBTQ en droit (OUTLAW) et le Comité de pilotage de l’Union de droit (Law Union) de l’université d’Ottawa voudraient inciter leurs membres et leurs collègues à prôner un discours qui s’éloignerait de l’importance démesurée accordée aux apparences, et qui valoriserait plutôt les idées et les compétences professionnelles.

Signé,

Les membres de l’exécutif d’OUTLAW  & les membres du Comité de pilotage de l’Union du Droit (Law Union) de Université d’Ottawa

Appuyé par :

Galldin Robertson Law ; L'association des étudiants musulmans en droit ;L'association des étudiants noirs en droit de l'Université d'Ottawa ; L’Association femmes et droit de l’université d’Ottawa ; L'association nationale des étudiants noirs en droit de Canada .



Designed by Rachel Gold.