#DanceIsMyExpression

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Some of our fabulous uOttawa law students invite you to #DanceIsMyExpression—a night of youth choreographed dance in support of mental health.

The night will feature dance pieces choreographed by Ottawa youth between the ages of 6 and 18 that are expressive of something they wanted to share with the world. These dancers have really done a fantastic job with their choreography. Their stories range from being in their happy place, to losing a grandparent, to bullying, to depression/suicidal thoughts, to friendship, to taking everything life throws at you. The showcase features all styles of dance and aspecial guest performance by YTV host Carlos Bustamante!

The showcase is being held on Friday Oct 14th from 7pm to 9:30pm at St. Paul's High School and all the proceeds from the event are going to the Paul Hansell Foundationa non-profit organization aimed at supporting the mental health and emotional well-being of youth. 


Tickets are available at: www.danceismyexpression.eventbrite.ca

An evening with Trey Anthony

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Save the Date: An Evening with Trey Anthony

The Joint Chair in Women’s Studies at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa will be hosting an evening with Trey Anthony, the award-winning playwright, actor, executive producer, and director of the theatrical production “Da Kink in My Hair”. 

Anthony was the first Black Canadian woman to write and produce a television show of the same name for the Global Television Network and has been a writer and producer for the W Network, Comedy Network and CTV.  Anthony volunteers with Black Queer Youth Group in Toronto, mentoring female adolescent girls and in 2009, she founded a woman-focused wellness facility The Trey Anthony@One Centre in Toronto.
Please save the date to hear and welcome this Canadian icon on Tuesday, November 1st 2016 from 4 – 6pm.  This is a bilingual event.
Want to see the play?  Plan to stay and watch the NAC production of “Da Kink in My Hair” that night!  For ticket information, please consult the NAC’s website: http://nac-cna.ca/en/event/13616.  Please note that we are looking into securing discount tickets.
More details on both the event and the tickets to follow soon.

Prenez date : Une soirée avec Trey Anthony

La Chaire conjointe en études des femmes, de l’Université d’Ottawa et Carleton University, organise une soirée avec Trey Anthony, dramaturge, comédienne, productrice exécutive et réalisatrice de la pièce de théâtre « Da Kink in My Hair ».

Couronnée de plusieurs prix, Mme Anthony est la première femme noire canadienne à écrire et à réaliser une émission télévisée, qui porte le même nom que sa pièce de théâtre, pour le Global Television Network et a travaillé comme scénariste et réalisatrice pour le W Network, le Comedy Network et CTV. Mme Anthony travaille aussi comme bénévole avec le Black Queer Youth Group à Toronto, où elle offre un encadrement aux adolescentes. En 2009, elle a fondé à Toronto le The Trey Anthony@One Centre, un centre de bien-être pour femmes.

Veuillez réserver la date du mardi 1er novembre 2016, de 16 h à 18 h, pour accueillir cette idole canadienne. L’événement est bilingue.

Voulez-vous voir la pièce de théâtre? Restez pour assister à la représentation de « Da Kink in My Hair » au CNA ce même soir! Pour plus d’information sur les billets, veuillez consulter le site Web du CNA : http://nac-cna.ca/fr/event/13616. Veuillez noter que nous explorons la possibilité d’offrir des billets à tarif réduit.


Plus de détails sur l’événement et les billets suivront prochainement.  

Looking for information on the Greenberg Chair's Sept 22nd and Feb 22nd events?

Saturday, September 17, 2016

For more information on the Greenberg Chair's Feb. 22nd, 2017 and Sept. 22nd. 2016 events showcasing a variety of opinions on legal responses to the sex trade, please scroll down.

Racism and the Robin Camp Inquiry


Daphne Gilbert, Lise Gotell & Elizabeth Sheehy

What does it mean to be “racialized” in Canada? And what does it have to do with our responses to sexual violence?

We used this term in our recent op ed on the Justice Camp Inquiry before the Canadian Judicial Council.  One of the points we made in this piece is that Justice Robin Camp’s alleged “re-education” on sexism (as it inhibited his ability to judge the issue of sexual assault fairly) seemingly failed to deal with the issue of racism, which we believe was also critical in this case.

We said this because the complainant at whom he directed his aggressive and disparaging remarks was a young Indigenous woman. We were reinforced in our view by the fact that the Crown prosecutor, whose effort to focus his attention on the law (as opposed to his opinions) he rebuffed with a cruel remark, was herself racialized.

But you won’t find the word in our op ed because the news agencies involved were not satisfied that we could demonstrate that the Crown prosecutor is either objectively a “woman of colour” or considers herself “racialized”. They were also understandably worried that ordinary readers would not know what this word means.

The difficulty is that being “racialized” is about how one is perceived and treated in a given society at a particular historical moment—it’s not about either “facts” such as physical appearance or “self-identity”. As our colleague Professor Joanne St Lewis observes, the issue is whether one is a member of a community that is subjected to racism. In other words, the word “racialized” recognizes that “race” and the subordination that accompanies this designation is not inherent in the person but is rather a social relation—an exercise of power.

So, while the “incomprehensible” and “unsubstantiated” word “racialized” was excised, we remain convinced that racism has been “whitewashed” out of the Camp Inquiry and that there is something critical to discuss. Too late—but we were able to substantiate our use of the word, with the help of our colleague Professor St Lewis. This Crown attorney self-identifies as “Arab” and even Statistics Canada recognizes that people viewed as “Arab” are “visible minorities.”  Arab-Canadians do experience discrimination in daily life in Canada. Lise Gotell comments that Ms Mograbee’s colleagues, including judges, saw this as a significant aspect of what unfolded in the now infamous sexual assault hearing before Justice Camp.


We hope by this comment to both acknowledge the gap between racialized and non-racialized communities in terms of knowledge and experience of racism, and contribute to our collective understanding of racism as a critical force in perpetuating and excusing sexual violence.  

Perspectives on Legal Responses to the Sex Trade

Friday, September 16, 2016

Perspectives on Legal Responses to the Sex Trade

 The Shirley Greenberg Chair in Women and the Legal Profession will present two events during the 2016-17 academic year showcasing a variety of perspectives on legal responses to the sex trade. Faculty members, staff, students, alumni and the broader University of Ottawa community hold very different opinions on the appropriate legal response to the sex trade in Canada, reflecting a spectrum of positions from abolitionism to de-criminalisation or legalisation. These events are intended to provide a venue for the respectful expression and debate of opinions along this spectrum.

The first event will take place in the fall term, on September 22nd, 2016, and will feature three speakers whose positions reflect a diversity of abolitionist perspectives.  The second event, planned for Feb. 22nd, 2017, will reflect a variety of legalisation and de-criminalisation perspectives. The order of these events is dictated by the availability of the speakers, and does not reflect a hierarchy of ideas.

One of the most important roles of a university is to create an environment for the free, respectful expression and exchange of ideas. At the Faculty of Law we aim to foster a space of inquiry, learning, debate and exchange. These two events are designed to educate the members of the law school community on the relevant debates, and to provide a forum for respectful questioning and discussion.

Below you will find a series of links to information on the spectrum of proposed legal responses to the sex trade.

Amnesty International’s research and policy work on decriminalization (set in an international context).


Emily Bazelon writes about the history of difficult feminist discussions on the sex trade.  

Janine Benedet offers an abolitionist perspective.

The Open Society Foundations offers Ten Reasons to Decriminalize Sex Work.

The Social Action and Executive Committees of the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies passed an abolitionist resolution.
Designed by Rachel Gold.